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Stroke From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to navigation Jump to search For other uses, see Stroke (disambiguation). Stroke Other names Cerebrovascular accident (CVA), cerebrovascular insult (CVI), brain attack MCA Territory Infarct.svg CT scan of the brain showing a prior right-sided ischemic stroke from blockage of an artery. Changes on a CT may not be visible early on.[1] Specialty Neurology, stroke medicine Symptoms Inability to move or feel on one side of the body, problems understanding or speaking, dizziness, loss of vision to one side[2][3] Complications Persistent vegetative state[4] Causes Ischemic (blockage) and hemorrhagic (bleeding)[5] Risk factors High blood pressure, tobacco smoking, obesity, high blood cholesterol, diabetes mellitus, previous TIA, end-stage kidney disease, atrial fibrillation[2][6][7] Diagnostic method Based on symptoms with medical imaging typically used to rule out bleeding[8][9] Differential diagnosis Low blood sugar[8] Treatment Based on the type[2] Prognosis Average life expectancy 1 year[2] Frequency 42.4 million (2015)[10] Deaths 6.3 million (2015)[11] A stroke is a medical condition in which poor blood flow to the brain causes cell death.[5] There are two main types of stroke: ischemic, due to lack of blood flow, and hemorrhagic, due to bleeding.[5] Both cause parts of the brain to stop functioning properly.[5] Signs and symptoms of a stroke may include an inability to move or feel on one side of the body, problems understanding or speaking, dizziness, or loss of vision to one side.[2][3] Signs and symptoms often appear soon after the stroke has occurred.[3] If symptoms last less than one or two hours, the stroke is a transient ischemic attack (TIA), also called a mini-stroke.[3] A hemorrhagic stroke may also be associated with a severe headache.[3] The symptoms of a stroke can be permanent.[5] Long-term complications may include pneumonia and loss of bladder control.[3] The main risk factor for stroke is high blood pressure.[6] Other risk factors include tobacco smoking, obesity, high blood cholesterol, diabetes mellitus, a previous TIA, end-stage kidney disease, and atrial fibrillation.[2][6][7] An ischemic stroke is typically caused by blockage of a blood vessel, though there are also less common causes.[12][13][14] A hemorrhagic stroke is caused by either bleeding directly into the brain or into the space between the brain's membranes.[12][15] Bleeding may occur due to a ruptured brain aneurysm.[12] Diagnosis is typically based on a physical exam and supported by medical imaging such as a CT scan or MRI scan.[8] A CT scan can rule out bleeding, but may not necessarily rule out ischemia, which early on typically does not show up on a CT scan.[9] Other tests such as an electrocardiogram (ECG) and blood tests are done to determine risk factors and rule out other possible causes.[8] Low blood sugar may cause similar symptoms.[8] Prevention includes decreasing risk factors, surgery to open up the arteries to the brain in those with problematic carotid narrowing, and warfarin in people with atrial fibrillation.[2] Aspirin or statins may be recommended by physicians for prevention.[2] A stroke or TIA often requires emergency care.[5] An ischemic stroke, if detected within three to four and half hours, may be treatable with a medication that can break down the clot.[2] Some hemorrhagic strokes benefit from surgery.[2] Treatment to attempt recovery of lost function is called stroke rehabilitation, and ideally takes place in a stroke unit; however, these are not available in much of the world.[2] In 2013, approximately 6.9 million people had an ischemic stroke and 3.4 million people had a hemorrhagic stroke.[16] In 2015, there were about 42.4 million people who had previously had a stroke and were still alive.[10] Between 1990 and 2010 the number of strokes which occurred each year decreased by approximately 10% in the developed world and increased by 10% in the developing world.[17] In 2015, stroke was the second most frequent cause of death after coronary artery disease, accounting for 6.3 million deaths (11% of the total).[11] About 3.0 million deaths resulted from ischemic stroke while 3.3 million deaths resulted from hemorrhagic stroke.[11] About half of people who have had a stroke live less than one year.[2] Overall, two thirds of strokes occurred in those over 65 years old.[17]